Southwinds

Overcoming Shyness

The problem is practice

Shy teens should practice stepping out of their comfort zones, because it will help them be more comfortable around other people.

Courtesy Google image

Shy teens should practice stepping out of their comfort zones, because it will help them be more comfortable around other people.

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Have you ever felt socially awkward?

According to Psychology Today, a group of renowned psychologists, academics and psychiatrists, “Technology and affluence may increase the level of shyness in our culture, explained in terms of greater social isolation, less practice in face-to-face conversations and avoidance of awkward interactions.”

Teenagers are always on their phones, tablets, and computers. They are more likely to communicate online rather than speaking to someone face to face.

Jose Maya, a freshman at South Mountain High School,  said, “Being shy affects me [by] not getting myself involved in social activities, to raising my hands or other little things. It affects me with almost everything.”

According to Teen Health, described on its website as a safe, private place for teens who need honest accurate information and advice about health, emotions and life, “Extreme feelings of shyness are often a sign of an anxiety condition called social phobia, often [needing] the help of a therapist to overcome extreme shyness.”

Kids Health, a website about health, behavior and development from before birth through the teen years, suggested that, “People who are shy tend to give themselves fewer chances to practice social behaviors. The more you practice social behaviors, the easier they get.”

Rayco Branch, a student intervention specialist at South Mountain High School, sometimes meets with shy students who are looking for help with the problem.

“Usually, if a student comes to me and they are shy about something … I ask them … if there’s a club or something they can join. Have they thought about getting a job? (There’s) something about having a job where you can get to meet coworkers, you get to greet customers. It helps you overcome some shyness.”

Teenagers are social beings. They want to be around other people. Self confidence can help build social behaviors that are needed to interact with peers. In order to overcome shyness, teenagers need to be willing to step out of their comfort zone and take that first step.

“I think what would help overcome my shyness,” Andrea Caperlac, a freshman at South, said. “Just start off slow, and make myself more comfortable being around other people and to just open up a bit more everyday.”

With each small step, there’s always progress being made.

 

 

 

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Overcoming Shyness